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ENGL 151: History and Literature of the 1920s (R. Spellman)  

Last Updated: Sep 3, 2013 URL: http://libguides.guilford.edu/engl151spellman Print Guide RSS Updates

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Library Instruction Goals

This guide should help you:

Form an approach to starting an assignment.

Explore topics for your paper or project. What motivates you?

Explore the Hege library's information resources.

Start to gather information for an assignment.
 

Guidelines

Information Guide

This assignment is designed to get you started on doing historical research and relating the information from the sources you find. Your goal in this assignment is to create a guide for future HP students who will have to write researched arguments on your topic. You want to give them a good starting place on their research—identifying some key sources they could use, explaining how to find those sources, and giving some advice on how they might think about their research project.

 Topic:

Your topic for research is very open. You should take a look at the index of Only Yesterday and/or do some web browsing on the 1920s to find possible topics. Think about particular people, events, places, inventions, ideas, legislation, fads, etc. Then do some preliminary research to see which one of those topics is most viable (i.e. has the most/easiest to find sources available). Once you have finalized your topic, you must send an e-mail to me with your chosen topic by Friday 9/6 at 11:59pm.

Audience:

Imagine someone in one of my future HP courses who needs some starting places for doing research on the same topic on which you are doing research.  What would be helpful to them?

Format:

12-point font. 1” margins. Single-spaced. Each annotation should start with a Chicago Style bibliography citation of the source and be followed by your annotation commentary on the source.

Research Restrictions:

For this assignment, you may find primary sources wherever you can—web pages, library sources, etc. However, secondary and reference sources must be books or articles accessed through library databases or the library stacks.

Your goal is to find the best sources for helping your audience get a solid foundation on this topic.

This assignment will have multiple sections:

·         Your guide should start with a brief (1 paragraph) introduction to your topic. Present a brief overview of the topic.

·         Primary source section (1 source for early draft, 2 for final draft).

o   Each source should have an annotation about the source (see below).

o   Each source should have a short paragraph that explains how someone else could find this source.

o   A section that explains why you chose these primary sources over the other primary sources you found in your research. You should specifically name the other sources you examined (2 for early draft, 3 for final draft) and be specific about the advantages of the sources you chose.

·         Secondary source section (1 source for early draft, 2 for final draft) (In the final draft, these sources should each present different arguments about your topic. The sources do not have to argue specifically with each other, but should represent different historical interpretations.)

o   Each source should have an annotation about the source (see below).

o   Each source should have a short paragraph that explains how someone else could find this source.

o   There should be a section that explains why you chose these secondary sources over the other secondary sources you found in your research. You should specifically name the other sources you examined (1 for early draft, 2 for final draft) and be specific about the advantages of the sources you chose.

·         Reference source section (1 for early draft and final draft)

o   This source should have an annotation about the source (see below)

o   This source should have a short paragraph that explains how someone else could find this source.

o   There should be a section that explains why you chose this reference source over the other reference sources you looked at during your research. You should specifically name the one other source you examined ad be specific about the advantages of the source you chose.

·         The final section should provide some advice for your audience on researching this subject. In 2-3 paragraphs, you should explain things like:

                                What difficulties might your audience encounter in doing the research?

                                What kinds of search terms would be particularly useful for your audience to use?

                                Which databases are most helpful?

                                What kinds of research questions should your audiene ask?

                                What kinds of controversies/tensions are related to your topic?

                                Etc.

 Annotations for each source:

. . . should identify the genre of the source (newspaper article, magazine article, scholarly journal article, poem, etc.) and any helpful information about the author  and the author’s audience (1-2 sentences).

 . . . should summarize the main point/argument of the source and highlight the key evidence the author uses (3-4 sentences).

 . . . should comment on the kinds of sources referenced by the source (as applicable) (1-2 sentences).

 . . . should explain how the source helps your readers to better understand this aspect of the 1920s. (Why would this source be useful when writing about this topic?) (1-2 sentences)

 

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